October 20, 2021

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Surfer doctor reveals how to protect yourself from shark bites

Find the gap between the hips and genitals, create a fist and press as hard as you can: According to Nicholas Taylor, medical dean of the Australian National University (ANU), this compression technique is more effective at stopping bleeding than traditionally used tourniquets.

His study, published Thursday in the journal Emergency Medicine Australia, showed that by squeezing a fist and squeezing the femoral artery, 89.7% of blood flow was stopped, and 43.8% using a plank leash. A temporary tour.

Many dangerous shark injuries occur in the legs, causing victims to bleed even if they bring it back to shore.

“I know from experience in emergency medicine that if there is excessive bleeding from the leg, you can push hard into the femoral artery and practically cut off all the blood flow to the leg,” the doctor said in a statement. ANU Friday.

This technique works equally well with or without a vest.

Taylor believes the technique will be widely known to about 500,000 Australian surfers, and shark encounters are no longer an exception for them.

“I want posters on the beaches. I want to publish it in the surfing community. People need to know that if someone bites, they can pull it out of the water and push it as hard as possible in that central place. It can stop almost all blood flow,” he said.

Shark attacks are rare but on the rise in Australia, mostly due to overcrowding.

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