October 7, 2022

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Elizabeth II’s coffin… more than 30 years in the making!

The public cannot see the Queen’s face as the coffin is closed and draped in rank and royal finery.

English oak and lead

According to the Times, the Queen’s coffin, like that of her husband Prince Philip, who died in April 2021, will be made of leaded English oak.

London funeral home Leverton and Sons, which it inherited when it began working with the palace in 1991, explained to a British newspaper four years ago that it was not known when or by whom the coffins were made.

“It’s made of English oak, which is very hard to find” and very expensive, his boss Andrew Leverton later explained.

The lead lining makes it possible to make the coffin hermetic, as it can be kept in a crypt and not buried. But she makes it too heavy for its eight carriers.

Brass handles were designed specifically for royal coffins, as was the lid, which had to be able to support the symbol of the monarchy.

“It’s not something you can do in a day,” Leverton told The Times.

Royal symbol

After being displayed in Edinburgh, the coffin will be flown to London on Tuesday evening. The next day, he will be placed on a purple-draped sling at the Palace of Westminster and watched over by guards.

The Royal Standard, the symbol of the monarchy, which traditionally floats above Buckingham, Sandringham or Windsor when the Queen is present, will cover her coffin.

Both royal emblems will be kept